September 23, 2013

Looking at Art is Not a Passive Act.

Giant babies in PlaceVendome in Paris

I have seen them with my own eyes. 

After checking out a few galleries in the Belleville neighborhood this weekend, I ended up strolling through the 1st arrondissement of Paris where I ran into an outdoor installation of work by Taiwanese artist Li Chen.



The spectrum of my reaction to the work went something like this: Shock, overwhelm, confusion, annoyance, curiosity, and finally pleasure.

Here’s the thing: Not all artwork reveals itself to you quickly. 
Sometimes you have to reach for it.

Looking is not a passive act.  Art rewards those who are willing to engage the work on its own terms, rather than comparing it to something else, or what we think it should be.

Regardless of our subjective likes, and dislikes, and expectations, there is always something to be discovered.

The most important thing to remember is to keep looking, exploring, and trying to understand art---the good, the bad, and even the incomprehensible. Because the next piece of art that absolutely thrills you and gives you goosebumps could be literally just around the corner.


BIG French Love,



 

1 comment:

  1. In July, I was fortunate to attend "Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity" at the Art Institute Of Chicago. I walked around a corner, and came face-to-face with Renoir's "The Swing" - and burst into tears! Something about the pure cobalt blue bows on the woman's dress just grabbed something primal within me.

    As artists, this is what we are trying to evoke, isn't it?

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